24 May 12 Most Famous Statues in the World | World’s Most Notorious Statues

12 Most Famous Statues in the World | World’s Most Notorious Statues

Christ the Redeemer Statue in Rio de Janeiro

 

When you’re looking for statues of famous people, it’s difficult to find one of someone more celebrated than Jesus Christ. Many believe that the unofficial award for most statues of a person in the world may very well go to Jesus. Construction on this beloved Art Deco piece began in 1926, and it only seems to become more popular as time passes. As one of the most iconic statues in the world, perhaps it should come as no surprise that Christ the Redeemer regularly shows up in films—particularly disaster movies. There’s something about the sight of one of the most famous statues in the world toppling to the ground, so this incredible piece has become known for its ability to create dramatic tension.

 

Statue of Liberty in New York

How many Statues of Liberty are there in the world? Just one. Widely acknowledged as one of the most amazing sculptures around the world, Lady Liberty welcomes immigrants and travelers to American shores. It’s certainly one of the most famous American statues, as well as one of the most famous statues on the planet. Constructed from copper, it was a gift from France to the United States. It was designed by Bartholdi and then built by Eiffel.

 

Venus de Milo in Paris

When it comes to famous statues with no arms, it’s difficult to conjure up a more celebrated piece than Venus de Milo. An ancient Greek sculpture that inspires admiration, it has achieved endless admiration as one of the most famous nude statues in the world. And although it is now renowned as one of the top famous statues on the planet, this dazzling piece of artwork was lost for centuries—until a peasant found it in ancient Greek ruins.

 

The Löwenmensch Figurine in Germany

Widely considered the oldest statue in the world, this lion-human hybrid piece has been carbon dated to approximately 40,000 years old. Due to its age, it is widely recognized as one of the more cool statues in the world. As far as beautiful statues go, it’s difficult to compete with this ivory slice of heaven. And when exquisite European statues are being mentioned, this fascinating figurine often finds a way into the conversation.

 

David in Florence

If you’re looking at a famous sculptors list, chances are that the name Michelangelo is bound to pop up. And David is considered by many to be his most outstanding work of art. Considered one of the best sculptures in the world, as well as one of the most famous statues in Italy, this marble marvel was completed in 1504.

 

The Thinker in Paris

Crafted by the brilliant Auguste Rodin, this compelling piece was dreamed up by the artist in 1880. Although there are about 28 of these pieces bedazzling the world, it’s important to note that not all of The Thinker pieces were created under the supervision of Rodin himself. In fact, some were even constructed after he died. When people ponder famous bronze statues, though, they usually reference The Thinker in Paris. Famous sculptures that stand the test of time require a certain je ne sais quoi, after all, and The Thinker seems to possess these special qualities.

 

Great Sphinx in Giza

When academics discuss popular statues across the world, the Great Sphinx is always hailed as a virtual miracle. It takes a special type of charm for a piece to be considered one of the best statues in the world for over a millennium, which means that the Great Sphinx exists in a category practically all its own. Made of limestone, the Sphinx has always inspired awe and curiosity. It is believed to be a depiction of the Pharaoh Khafre, but this has been up for debate and is not by any means a verified fact. Mysteriously enough, surprisingly little is known about this iconic statue’s history. Some scientists seem determined to learn more about the iconic artwork’s age, which is why many have attempted to use erosion theories and other methods to date it.

 

Charles Sumner in Cambridge

Situated in the midst of Harvard Square, Anne Whitney’s beautiful depiction of abolitionist Charles Sumner also stirred up some controversy. When it was discovered that she was a woman after she won a prize to create the sculpture, her winnings were rescinded because it was thought improper for a female sculptor to sculpt a man’s legs. However, it would appear that Whitney has had the last laugh. Sitting tall for all to see, her portrayal of Sumner has become a staple in the backdrop of those studying at one of the finest institutions in the world.

 

The Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C.

Sometimes the concepts for a great statue are so big that they demand a larger platform. Such was the case with the Lincoln Memorial, which was originally slated to be only 10 feet tall. After its design by Daniel Chester French and construction by the Piccirilli brothers, the memorial gained a whopping nine feet.

 

Balloon Dog in New York

As one of the art world’s most provocative figures, perhaps it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Jeff Koons crafted one of its most polarizing statues. An ode to childhood, Balloon Dog was sold for an eye-popping $58.4 million just a few years back. The statue calls to mind the balloon animals that are often made for children at birthday parties.

 

The Little Mermaid in Copenhagen

A famous 20th-century ballerina, Ellen Price, was the face model upon which this magnificent mermaid was made. The sculptor Edvard Eriksen’s wife served as the model for its body. This bronze statue sits on a rock near the Langelinie promenade in Denmark. Over the years, the statue has been subject to all manner of vandalism, including having paint thrown on it, but somehow it seems to endure the harshest treatment without any problems.

 

Spring Temple Buddha in Henan

Completed over a decade ago, this Buddha is considered the second-tallest statue in the entire world. Standing at over 400 feet, it depicts the Vairocana Buddha and inspires many across the world.

 

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